Dear (pseudo) Rich People


Those who have talked to me regarding people who does networking (for money) such as joining or running a pyramid scheme or Multi Level Marketing (MLM), would think I hate them with a passion. I have to correct that statement and explain my stand in this matter. I don’t hate them. But hate most of these people’s marketing skills (or lack thereof).

Aside from those on the higher level, many of those who actively running a networking campaign, I believe, is doing it wrong. Many are shoving their products or services onto the faces of their prospecting clients, and hope that the client will like it. The news is, they don’t.

If any of you (who are doing this right now) don’t believe me, try taking something you like, and have somebody else shove it into your face at random times everyday for a week. See what you feel about the thing then.

Many of the things they are doing, are blasphemy to the advertising industry. It’s the same tactic that companies use to advertise their product as often as possible in a certain time frame, in hoping that it sticks to the potential clients’ brain. The thing is, if the advert is wrongly done, it’s stick on negatively, and prove to be a marketing disaster.

I’d like to suggest some alternative marketing that, to me, have greater impact both consciously, or subconsciously. 

First, instead of showing a wad of money that people would presume is loaned, withdrew to be photographed, and then either paid to the “upline” or whatever you call them, show them your lavish lifestyle.

duit-vs-life

I mean, seriously. Real rich men don’t flaunt their belongings. Those who do are those who just became rich or wanting to become rich. Rich people flaunt their lifestyle. They don’t buy big cars to show off, but they show that they can afford the luxury and the comfort the car offers. They don’t buy a mansion to show off, but they want the space, luxury and most importantly the privacy that entails.

So, while driving around in a Beemer may be too far off for you, show off that you can afford to go vacation every couple of month or so. Just show that you can afford to take some time off and splurge on life, which is more believable then taking a picture of you holding a wad of money and posting it on Facebook. I mean, that money is better spent investing than to show off. Seriously.

Stop telling people how you got rich, but make them ask you. Buy high end phones, preferably smartphones. Make sure your car keys show that they are high end cars’. Wear subtly branded clothes (a big logo on the chest only makes you a walking billboard. Sport jersey, however, is acceptable).  While using this stuff, just use it as if it’s nothing to you. As if this is normal. Be careful not to overdo this part, as it may seem plastic and worse, cause you financial damage.

If your main mode of advertising is social network sites, show that you’ just bought the new high end phone (for example) you’ve always wanted. Mention the business, if you want, but limit it to a passing mention, as a side note of sorts. of the 5 sentences you made about the phone, just one passing mention about the business is enough. Do not overdo.

Now, the most important skill any networking effort needs is storytelling,
When they ask you how can you afford all this, then ask them if they want to be like you. Tell them, what if, you can make their life better, at least financially. Give them a reason to listen to your business proposal.
Once the ‘why’ question have been asked and answered, tell them how you did it. Show enthusiasm when telling the story. Practice pauses, punch line, and most importantly, make it move them. Burn the passion fuel inside their heart. Start slow, and build up to a climax, which should be the time you discovered this business of yours, and how your life start changing. It’s better if you can incorporate hardships prior to starting this business, and if possible, make the hardship something relatable to the potential client.

If done correctly, the client’s heart should be opened up enough at this time for you to lay down the business itself. Of course, concentrate on the basics only, since they haven’t commit anything yet. Of course, this is where many just jump into. Or the How question. Many skipped the ‘Why’, which is why people are not quite moved by your interesting story.

Imagine telling people about a journey. You can tell them how you travelled and what happened during the journey, which maybe very interesting. But it ends there. The audience are not moved to do the journey themselves. They need a reason. So unless the audience have a reason of their own, you need to provide them with one.

There, I hope this will help those in this networking business, to better advertise their products or services, and don’t litter my inboxes, Facebook wall, and car windscreen with flyers full of meaningless text, or images that doesn’t inspire.

Like what I always say to my students: Learn to inspire potential clients to buy your product like Steve Jobs does.

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